Eric J. Johnson

Eric J. Johnson photo

Eric J. Johnson

Norman Eig Professor of Business; Director, Center for the Decision Sciences, Marketing, Columbia Business School
Columbia University

Eric Johnson is the inaugural holder of Columbia Business School’s Norman Eig Chair of Business and director of the school’s Center for Decision Sciences. He previously taught at Carnegie Mellon University and was a visiting professor at the Sloan School at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Johnson’s research examines the interface between behavioral decision research, economics, and consumer and managerial decisions, including the implications for public policy, markets and marketing. He has explored, among other topics, how the presentation of options affects people’s choices concerning Social Security benefit claiming, organ donation and investments. He earned his B.A. at Rutgers University and M.S. and Ph.D. in psychology from Carnegie-Mellon University.

Professional Achievements

  • Recipient, Fellow in Consumer Behavior Award, Association for Consumer Research, 2012.
  • Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award, Society for Consumer Psychology, 2011.
  • Served as associate editor of the Journal of Consumer Psychology, senior editor of Decision Sciences at Behavioral Science and Policy, and editor of Frontiers in Decision Neuroscience.
  • Published research in Science, Psychological Review, Psychological Science, Nature Neuroscience, Harvard Business Review, Journal of Economic Theory, and many other consumer, economic, marketing and psychology journals.

Publications

May 2016
More than 30 million Americans are projected to retire in the next decade – and most have not saved nearly enough for retirement. Moreover, almost half of all Social Security recipients claim benefits at the earliest possible age (62), which can greatly reduce their total lifetime benefits.
June 2016
More than 30 million Americans are projected to retire in the next decade – and most have not saved nearly enough for retirement. Moreover, almost half of all Social Security recipients claim benefits at the earliest possible age (62), which can greatly reduce their total lifetime benefits.