Herman A. Berliner

Herman A. Berliner photo

Herman A. Berliner

Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs; Lawrence Herbert Distinguished Professor and Professor of Economics
Hofstra University

Herman A. Berliner is the Lawrence Herbert Distinguished Professor at Hofstra University. In 2015, he stepped down as provost after 25 years in that position and became dean of the Frank G. Zarb School of Business, where he focuses on increasing and promoting international business programs and student entrepreneurship. On January 1, 2019, he returned as Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.

As provost, Berliner was responsible for all of Hofstra’s colleges, schools and academic programs, as well as its libraries, museum, and Saltzman Community Services Center. He has taught economics at graduate and undergraduate levels and specializes in the economics of higher education. He earned his B.A. from the City University of New York and Ph.D. in economics from CUNY Graduate School.

 

Professional Achievements

  • Oversaw the launch of Hofstra’s Course and Teacher Evaluation Program, Honors Program, Peer Teaching Program, and University Tutorial Program.
  • Helped establish Hofstra’s School of Communication, Honors College, School of Engineering and Applied Science, and School of Health Professions and Humans Services.
  • Served as a reviewer for Middle States, the American Bar Association, and the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business.
  • School of Nursing and Physician Assistant Studies.

Publications

March 2015
Colleges and universities today face challenges on multiple fronts. While many have fared quite well, it can be difficult to flourish without a new business model.
September 2010
Accreditations are third-party verifications of quality. At the extreme, accreditations can be gatekeepers—without the accreditation you cannot operate. Other accreditations are more or less voluntary depending on particular state policies.
October 2007
For us to be successful in recruiting the next generation of academic leadership, we need to fully understand the changes that have taken place in higher education.